Process of Executive Development Programs

Not surprisingly, people are most willing to attend training that has direct, concrete applications in their world – technical knowledge relate to their jobs. But when asked which would greatly increase their effectiveness at work, the number one answer, was executive development program.

Executive Development Program is basically leadership development program, and, in this article, we shall explain the three fundamental responsibilities an executive has. Leadership is a process by which an executive can guide, direct and influence the behaviors and working style of others to achieve the common goal of the organization. It is defined as the potential to influence and motivate others.

An executive has three fundamental responsibilities:

They need to craft vision, build alignment, and they should champion execution. There’s a lot of skills that goes into each of these responsibilities.

When leaders lack a clear vision of the group’s future, they are feeling their way through the execution process, relying on day-to-day revelations. Sure, they have a collection of goals, plans, and schedules, but they don’t see the underlying tapestry, how everything fits together. They’re much less likely to realize when priorities are misplaced or when opportunities are passing them by. Vision, however, is more than just the efficient use of time and resources. A truly great vision elevates our work. It sparks our imaginations. It touches on our human need to do something of value with our lives.

Think of difference between a beaver building a dam based on its instincts and a team of people building the Indira Dam. The vision of the Indira Dam involved reimagining not just a river but an entire landscape. That vision opened a whole awe-inspiring array of possibilities for the land and the community. Visions are designed to inspire us. They speak something that is uniquely human. Your executive development program should consider this factor.

Building alignment is the second responsibility an executive has after creating a vision. Building alignment is an act of gaining buy-in for the vision crafted and it’s critical in moving from imagination to reality. For an executive’s development, building alignment is as crucial as vision. It is people centric and is therefore as complex and unpredictable as human relationships. The full spectrum of human motivations, personalities, cultural understandings, perspectives, and needs is present in your workplace every day.

The people you work with may be seasoned employees or new hires, with vastly different experiences and levels of responsibilities. But building alignment means ensuring that every person understands his or her role in making the vision a reality. An executive also understand that alignment is not something to check off a to-do list. Alignment is dynamic, ongoing process that requires continual monitoring and realigning as conditions and needs change. By staying plugged in, an executive can quickly tell when alignment begins to wane, and they can then give the time and energy needed to revive it. Your executive development program should consider this factor.

At its most basic level, execution is making the vision a reality. And not just any reality, but the right reality, one that takes the imagined future and turns it into a real accomplishment. Execution is how organizations and teams take all the good ideas and tun them into results. While an executive may or may not be directly involved in day-to-day implementation and production, they are always responsible for ensuring that people have what they need to do their work effectively. Successful execution of a vision can’t happen without the deep commitment. Your executive development program should consider this factor.

For developing an executive, it is important that the executive have deep understanding of all these three responsibilities and therefore, while designing an executive development, one must keep in mind these crucial responsibilities.

Filed under: Leadership

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